Wildlife, Environmental Conservation & Game Park Management

Volunteer at a Rhino, Sable and Elephant Conservancy with a track record of releasing wildlife into national parks.

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TRUSTED AND RECOGNISED

Our team has been the first Zimbabwe-based turnkey provider of cross-cultural exchanges through volunteering, and internship placements at matched organisations.

Rhinos are in real danger of extinction and we are at the forefront of trying to ensure the species is kept alive. Along with rhinos on the endangered species list are pangolins as well as sables. The wildlife, environment conservation & game park management programme utilises a community-based approach to conservation

wherein the communities surrounding the conservancy are the first line of defence against poachers as whistleblowers. As such, this African wildlife volunteer programme combines hands-on work inside the conservancy, taking care of the wildlife, whilst interacting heavily with the surrounding communities to enhance the environmental and wildlife conservation efforts.

What's the programme about?

The conservancy is primarily a rhino and sable breeding sanctuary and has released several rhinos into their original habitat on the Zambezi escarpment. If you want to get involved in protecting and preserving the future of Rhinos and volunteer at a rhino sanctuary, this is the programme for you! Conservation through education is a recurring theme within the conservancy and is extended to the surrounding communities. A huge investment was dedicated to building a primary school so that local children and future generations can receive a good education. A computer lab was built with the support of volunteers who donated their time and resources in order to ensure that the surrounding community members can connect, and engage with, the rest of the world. Further community development goals include opening a community clinic as well as being able to provide much-needed assistance to local children.

A significant part of this project is also community outreach, combining conservation education with healthcare improvement programmes. This creates a win-win situation whereby local community members’ healthcare needs are considered and met, whilst they are encouraged to take care of the local environment and its wildlife. All in all, this is an African wildlife programme that truly makes a difference!

What sort of work will I be doing?
  • Rhino handling and tracking 
  • Elephant handling and tracking 
  • On-going animal game counts, data collection and reporting
  • Support research programmes, including animal population dynamics, predator/prey synergies, mapping of vegetation and fire management
  • Conduct animal and bird surveys – population monitoring
  • Carryout tree planting exercises, while removing foreign invasive species from surrounding forests
  • Environmental management and wilderness rehabilitation
  • Wildlife conservation and environment preservation and protection outreach work within local communities and schools
Here's a layout of a typical day in the programme

Activities vary depending on the time of year you travel and level of experience. However, generally, you can expect early morning wake-up calls, breakfast and lunch daily. On most days, the first activity is checking for any poaching activities the night before, snares and traps.

TimeActivity
06h00 Elephant handling and tracking
08h30 Breakfast
09h00 Game Park Maintenance: cleaning Bomas & mending fences
12h30 Lunch
14h30 Anti-poaching practice using paint ball guns
15h30 Rhino handling and feeding
17h00 Home Time
Where will you stay?

Accomodation

There are two modern houses on the conservancy and volunteers will be allocated to any of the two depending on availability. There is a swimming pool, braai (barbeque) area and a dam that you will have the option to canoe. 

As it is in the bush, there is no Wi-Fi connection at the house and you can access the Internet only at the computer lab on certain days. All meals, snacks and soft drinks are provided apart from Sunday when you can get creative in the fully equipped kitchen.

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What do you need to apply?

Tiritose supports volunteers and interns coming to Zimbabwe and ensures that the experience is equally rewarding for yourself and our programme.  Our application process is split into two categories:

Volunteers – require some of the following:

  • Degree / Masters / PhD  in Conservation, Wildlife, Zoology, Environment, Veterinary science, Animal science or related field
  • Must have work experience within a related field
  • Passport valid for at least (6) months from the date of your intended stay in Zimbabwe

Interns – require some of the following:

  • Gap Year, student or training for a university degree or technical college in Conservation, Zoology, Animal Science or related field
  • An interest and passion for working with animals, and the environment
  • Some experience within the conservation field would be beneficial

Rhino & Elephant Volunteer Programme Highlights

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HIGHLIGHTS

Rhinos are in real danger of extinction and we are at the forefront of trying to ensure the species is kept alive. Along with rhinos on the endangered species list are pangolins as well as sables. The wildlife, environment conservation & game park management programme utilises a community-based approach to conservation, wherein the communities surrounding the conservancy are the first line of defense against poachers as whistle blowers. As such, the programme combines hands-on work inside the conservancy, taking care of the wildlife, whilst interacting heavily with the surrounding communities to enhance the environmental and wildlife conservation efforts.

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Testimonials

BENEFIT THAT GOES FULL-CIRCLE – WHAT OUR PARTICIPANTS HAVE SHARED:

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Stuart Smith United States, Ohio State University

This has truly been a life changing experience, especially because it was my first trip outside of the United States. The program taught me to be more open to taking new experiences, exposed me to paediatrics at the children’s rehabilitation unit, which I did not think I would enjoy.

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Necrisha Roach United States, Ohio State University

Coming to Zimbabwe for my medical internship and working with Tiritose was an interesting experience and I really enjoyed the exposure to the healthcare system, the people and the excursions

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Christopher Zheng United States, Ohio State University

I was pretty happy the whole time and the Tiritose staff were very supportive. What I enjoyed most about doing my internship in Zimbabwe is that it was a new continent for me, a whole new perspective on medicine, a better appreciation for the luxuries of US.

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Sola Morakinyo United States, Ohio State University

What I enjoyed most about doing my medical clinical rotation internship in Zimbabwe was seeing the differences and similarities in how medicine is practiced here vs. the U.S. and differences and similarities in disease incidence.

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Van Don Williams II United States, Ohio State University

The programme was also very organised. Other than waiting on our supervising physicians at the Children’s hospital on some of the days, it was a pretty good internship. Oh! And it was made better by watching Black Panther in Africa.

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Jessica Hippolyte United States, Ohio State University

I really liked the balance between the fun staff and the clinical rotations at the various hospitals in the city and the rural placement just blew me away. I was exposed to medical conditions that I would otherwise not come across back home.

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Martins Ayoola-Adeola United States, Ohio State University

I had a wonderful time in Zimbabwe. There are times I find myself fantasizing about going back. The administrative staff were great and really took the time to make the trip as personalized as possible.

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